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#8 Four steps to generating and converting new business opportunities with Katie Street



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Selling is the lifeblood of a business, but lots of us find it really tricky. We get too eager, tongue tied, put people off or sometimes don’t even realise when people are really interested. With a career spanning across large and small agencies, both brand and client side, and now Founder of Street Agency, Katie Street enables agencies to get noticed by the brands that need them.


In this episode, Katie provides a number of tips and tricks to help you build new relationships, generate leads and improve your conversion rate. She has a very honest view discussing how to build trust, be helpful, give back and remember to be human in your approach to sales.


This episode of The 10th Degree covers:


  • Defining your sales pitch

  • Creating and implementing your value proposition

  • The power of events

  • The psychology of selling

  • Referral schemes and employee advocacy

  • Showcasing case studies


Links:


Street Agency: https://street.agency/ Katie Street: https://www.linkedin.com/in/katiestreet/


Richmond Events: https://www.richmondevents.com/

Simon Sinek “Start with why”: https://www.freshworks.com/freshsales-crm/resources/summary-of-start-with-why-blog/

AAR Group: https://aargroup.co.uk/

The Drum: https://www.thedrum.com/

BIMA: https://bima.co.uk/

E-consultancy: https://econsultancy.com/

IPA: https://ipa.co.uk/


Anthony Story: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anthony-story-4032a63/

Podcast Labs: https://www.podcastlabs.co.uk/


Key highlights:


“I just knew that there was a better way for new business to be done, because agencies of every size, regardless of them being huge networks, very well famed agencies or very small, find it really hard to find fantastic new business talent or to run fantastic new business strategy. So I knew there was a way because I'd had such great success in the roles that I had, and hoped that I could teach agencies and clients how to better engage with prospects.”


“So an opportunity to me is when there's a live brief of some sort, whether that's a verbal, brief or written brief, or sometimes the best type, the easiest to convert type are the opportunities that you can actually go and create by you really nurturing a relationship with a business, defining problems that they might have, creating a solution for that problem, and then you're often then in a non compete situation, because you've helped them identify a problem within their business, they probably haven't briefed lots of other agencies, you're helping them solve it, and the conversion rate on those kind of opportunities is much better.”


“People buy from people that they trust. So number one is make sure that you're getting the most out of your referrals. Are you asking the people within your business to help refer you on and getting as many referrals as you possibly can do? The best agencies and companies that I work with have a referral scheme so all of their staff, you're going back to employee advocacy are encouraged to make referrals and often incentivize to do that.”


"A lot of it is about bravery. And most people if you're doing a fantastic job for them will refer you on so it's, it's really, really important that you ask and don't be ashamed to ask.

“The biggest thing that I advise clients to do is to be helpful. So if you can be seen to be helping someone, so when your client, on their personal LinkedIn or their personal Instagram, if they're looking to get some help with something, then help them comment on things, share things for them, if you can be helping them and using those networks, naturally, that it will come back to you.”


“So just thinking about the psychology of the language that you use is super important. And you know following the language that your prospects or the people that you want to engage with use, being very aware of the kind of language that they use, you can use tools like Grammarly. There's a fantastic platform called "Crystal Knows" which anyone who's in business I would recommend downloads, which is a plugin that you can put on your LinkedIn profile. And when you're looking at people it tells you about their personality, how they'd like to be spoken to, how you might, you know, be able to reach out to them to get better engagement and it will even help you craft outreach emails.”


“I think that's often what people forget to do in their marketing, people shout about what their services are and their how, but they don't think about the benefits that they provide. If you're looking to buy a product or a service, you need to be sold the need and the benefit, not the why and the how. A lot of people talk about the "Simon Sinek Why" and things like that, and I think "why" is really important, but actually, I think it goes deeper than that and it's not just the why, it's the how and the benefit that comes out of that that's really important to me.”


“If you can really articulate your strength and how you help companies, or how you help a person when they're buying your product, then you can define and develop much more effective marketing strategies that will attract the kind of customers that are much easier to convert because they need you in the first place.”


“There's lots of startups certainly, for instance, in the FinServ and in the FinTech sector, there's lots of startups and various other people coming into the market moving much more quickly than maybe the big banks can. So therefore, the big banks need to move and act a lot more quickly than they probably have done in the past. So them employing another big agency that have got the same layers of complexity as they have, isn't necessarily a good choice for them anymore. So they want these smaller, faster innovation companies that are able to help them change and evolve much more quickly so that they can either catch up with the startups or, you know, try and stay one step ahead.”


“The biggest advice that I can give, certainly to B2B agencies and tech and software providers is if you can tell people how you help them. The what you do may change over time.”


“Don't over navel gaze, but also don't forget to do it, I guess, do kind of relook at yourself once every year and say, "okay, how have we changed in the last year? Is there anything different from where we were last year? Are we helping companies do different things to what they were doing or what we were doing with them last year?" Don't be afraid to look at that.”


“People spend an awful lot of time in my experience really looking at themselves and trying to define a value proposition that's strong, and then they put it on their website, they shove it in their pitch deck, and that's done. We've done our value proposition. It's on the website brilliant. What they forget to do is build their marketing strategy and tactics around it. So don't then forget you that if you're an agency that helps people deliver things faster, then you should develop some kind of marketing tactics that represent fastness.”


“I don't have any relationship with the CEO of giffgaff, or the CEO of the British Red Cross. The subject that we've pushed out to them, we've done some research on we've developed a really strong message, we picked a nice venue that has a bit of a story behind it, we've got some fantastic speakers there. So they're attracted in because it's something that they need to do or they need to change or they need help with and they're interested in the subject. So developing a subject that is going to resonate with your audience is hugely important.”


Transcript


Anthony Story 0:00

Selling - it's the lifeblood of a business, but lots of us find it really tricky. We get too eager, tongue tied, put people off, or sometimes don't even realise when people are really interested. It's a quagmire of confusion. In fact, it would be really helpful if they could teach selling techniques in school. But they don't. So while getting enough leads is important, it's not necessarily everything. If you get 5 leads and convert them all that's probably simpler than converting 5 out of 50 leads. So the important thing is you've got to be able to tell the right story when you connect with people. Katie Street is the Founder of Street Agency. She's hugely experienced in business development and sales, and bravely fights through the beginnings of a cold to talk to me. She's great at explaining how to understand the value of your proposition. She explains how to make sure you see your business from your clients perspective and understand the benefits you offer, as they want them, not as how you want to offer them. It turns out that often the best way to understand them is just to ask them, and trust is incredibly important. Adding value outside of your core offer can help. And Katie explains how you can access top CEOs, maybe by hosting small events with the right speakers, or by discussing things they really care about, and want to hear. Anyway, it's great, it's full of ideas of how you can try and connect with the people you're really trying to reach. Hope you enjoy it, oh, and don't forget, obviously, reviews are always appreciated. Unless you're on Spotify, in which case, tell a friend, phone a friend, go 50-50, whatever, we'd just love you to share the information.


Anthony Story 1:52

I'm really pleased to be joined by Katie Street today. Katie's mastered what many of us find the most challenging part of growing a business, and that's getting enough customers. We've got loads of names for it: business development, sales, client services, or just plain old schmoozing. Obviously, it's really important, but it's really hard as well. And I know some people think that it's a bit of a dark art maybe. But there are rules we can learn. Some things clearly work better than others and Katie is definitely the person to tell us what they are. She's got some brilliant credentials. She's been an Account Director, Sales Director, Business Development Director, Marketing Director. In fact all the titles you want to see in some big international companies. Only last year, she took all of that experience and took the leap to set up her own company, so you're an entrepreneur now as well?


Katie Street 2:47

I am yeah, it's very exciting as well!


Anthony Story 2:50

Well, I think something that sets Katie apart in my mind is that she's worked pretty much exclusively, selling the services of marketing and digital agencies, to people who work in marketing. Now, given that they spend their lives trying to get people to buy their own stuff, they must be some of the hardest and possibly most cynical bunch of people that you've got to sell to. So I think if you managed to break through into that market, you can probably do anything. And despite all of that, you look very lively, you seem very positive. So why don't you start by telling us about when you decided to set up your own business, the Street Agency, how did you know it was the right time?


Katie Street 3:29

Oh that's a big question! I guess, I probably knew from a very young age that I was going to go out on my own at some point, but it was just about being brave enough to do it. For the last, well, Anthony, you've just met my daughter, I have an 11 year old, so I think I probably wanted to go out in business on my own a long time ago, but didn't necessarily have all of the experience or the connections that I needed and also was a little bit scared because I had a young daughter. So I think there were two things that enabled me to push out on my own. First of all, was having the experience and the network behind me, and knowing that I could jump into being paid straight away. Because initially when I first set up on my own, I went into a consultancy role. So I had already kind of sorted it out before I made the leap. So I didn't leap into nothing. I knew what I wanted to do. I had a plan. Well I had a plan in my head, but not a full written down business plan, I just thought, "well, I think this is gonna work." But the reasons that I went out on my own were twofold. One, I didn't want a boss anymore. I was fed up, I guess I'm quite forthright in what I think I should do or what I think is the right solution. So I had a very good idea of, you know, what I could do and I didn't want necessarily someone to tell me how to do it. I wanted to be able to make those decisions myself, which I guess is one of my frustrations that comes from my employment over the years. And then secondly, I guess the biggest reason was to have the freedom to really go out and start to do what I believed in and try and make a big change in the industry. So I was very frustrated having, like you say, led new business, and marketing at big digital marketing agencies and small creative agencies. I've had a very good blended mix across the last 10 years since I've been agency side, prior to working brand and client side, a really good mix of different agencies. I just knew that there was a better way for new business to be done. I'd been headhunted by lots of agencies been offered fantastic salaries, fantastic opportunities in London and New York and all over the place, and just knew that there was a better way for new business to be done because agencies of every size regardless of them, being huge networks, very well famed agencies or very small, find it really hard to find fantastic new business talent. To run, fantastic new business strategy, so I knew there was a way because I'd had such great success in the roles that I had. I knew there was a better way for it to be done, you know, and hoped that I could teach agencies and clients how to better engage with prospects.


Anthony Story 6:16

Can I take you back a step before we get into what you do now?What kind of stuff was it that you were focusing on then and what did you perceive was the weakness in the approach that you had that made you see and think there was better way of doing it? What were you doing and what did you feel were the frustrations that you had in terms of it not being effective?


Katie Street 6:20

Yeah, I guess sometimes it was CEOs of the agencies that I was working for not wanting to let go of budget and being brave enough to do things differently. So that was frustration number one.


Anthony Story 6:53

Budget for what?


Katie Street 6:54

I guess marketing budget, signing off some form of marketing budget or sales budget. You know, ideally you would have both if you're in a larger organisation.


Anthony Story 7:03

So these are the people who are employing you, you've got a big vision of what you want to try and do to make their company be amazing, and they're going "sounds great, but I'm not going to pay for it." Is that because they don't have faith that it's going to be money well spent?


Katie Street 7:15

Yeah. And one thing that I used to hear over and over again, which is incredibly frustrating, is "well just wait till you win the next piece of new business and then we'll sign it off. So if you win another client or sign another deal, whatever it might be, that's when we'll release the budget because you have to do that first." Obviously, every part of new business is super, super important, but a lot of my time was spent on I guess "the opportunity to win" process and did a fantastic job at that, I mean, within the agency landscape, a kind of average opportunity to win is probably anything between 20% and 30%, when I've been performing at my best and it's not just me, it's always part of a team, we were able to change that to between 60% and 70%.


Anthony Story 8:05

What does "opportunity to win" actually mean?


Katie Street 8:07

So I guess it's different in different companies. Sometimes an opportunity might be, you know, once you've been given a brief by a client and you need to come up with some kind of creative solution, it might be a stricter process where you have to do an ITT or an RFP, and then a pitch...


Anthony Story 8:25

...or an invitation to tender or a request for proposal?


Katie Street 8:29

Yes exactly well done Anthony telling everyone what it means, for those that don't know


Anthony Story 8:33

Just reminding myself it's been a while!


Katie Street 8:35

Well done very good. So an opportunity to me is when there's a live brief of some sort, whether that's a verbal, brief or written brief, or sometimes the best type, the easiest to convert type are the opportunities that you can actually go and create by you really nurturing a relationship with a business, defining problems that they might have, creating a solution for that problem, and then you're often then in a non compete situation, because you've helped them identify a problem within their business, they probably haven't briefed lots of other agencies, you're helping them solve it, and the conversion rate on those kind of opportunities is much better.


Anthony Story 9:16

I think that's a really massive challenge for any service model based company. And that's something that I hear a lot from people in terms of how do you get those contacts in the first place? So let's come on to that now because it's a really good question. And I think trying to understand, "okay, I've got to go out there, I've got to push myself and meet people." And there are things that we have called networking. Nobody really knows what networking is. What is that? It feels as if there's some official way that you should network but it just seems a lot more haphazard than that in real life. So how did you go about doing that? So you're responsible for your company, and it's your job to get more customers for the people. So, presumably some of that will come from repeat business. But if you're just going to go out and find somebody for the very, very first time, what's in your mind? How do you start planning that? And how do you convert that plan into people actually talking to the people who can deliver what they want?


Katie Street 10:18

Yes. So this is a challenge. And I think there's probably quite an easy solution. So actually, I went to a breakfast event last week for a company called Richmond Events, and they do large scale, I guess, kind of matchmaking type, breakfasts, day seminars, conferences, etc. and had some really interesting research on what the marketing industry are looking for when they're looking to engage an agency, what problems they're facing, you know budget is still right up there, but also, so is your employee advocacy. So they released this report, and one of the most interesting, and back to your point, things that came out in the report is, and I think we probably all know it, is "people buy from people that they trust", and often the majority of opportunities will come through some form of referral, because you'll ask someone, you know, do you know anyone that can help me with this problem that we have in the business or that we need to deliver this digital transformation project or we've got a new branding opportunity for a new product launch that we've got. And they will often go to other people within the business friends, or someone that they respect within that kind of specialism be it marketing or design or whatever it might be, and ask for a referral. So number one is make sure that you're getting the most out of your referrals. Are you asking the people within your business to help refer you on and getting as many referrals as you possibly can? The best agencies and companies that I work with have a referral scheme so all of their staff, you're going back to employee advocacy are encouraged to make referrals and often incentivize to do that. So that's, I guess, number one.


Anthony Story 12:00

Do you go to existing clients as well or is it just about the people working inside the business?


Katie Street 12:06

Both! Yeah, if you can do both, and you're confident to do both, then I think you should do. If you're doing a great job for your client then 1) ask for a testimonial 2) ask if they've got any friends in the industry, who you could help as well, if so, would you mind referring me on? A lot of it is about bravery. There could be some kind of kickback or an invoice that could be sent to say thank you for your introduction, or you know, take them out for dinner or whatever it might be, just being brave enough to ask and you do need to have good relationships to be able to do that. And most people if you're doing a fantastic job for them will refer you on so it's, it's really, really important that you ask and don't be ashamed to ask.


Anthony Story 12:50

Okay, and you talked about fear earlier on, but fear is a real thing. Can I just ask, if you get a testimonial, what do you do with it? What should you do?


Katie Street 12:59

What's the best that you can do with a testimonial? That's a good question. So the obvious thing is put it on your website, which of course we should all do. But what people then forget to do is then tell people that it's on their website, and they're expecting people to randomly come and find their website, and therefore that everyone's going to know about this fantastic referral. So you know, social media is a fantastic platform. If you're in B2B, then certainly you need to be looking at LinkedIn. LinkedIn 100% for agencies to market themselves to clients. Number one point of call. Actually quite interesting reports now show Instagram is the fastest growing so probably now better than Twitter, and other platforms, so Instagram's growing really, really quickly so push them out, use your social channels. In fact, ask the people that you're talking to or asking you to refer. Make sure that they're sharing out through their social channels. The biggest thing that I advise clients to do is to be helpful. So if you can be seen to be helping someone, so when your client, on their personal LinkedIn or their personal Instagram, if they're looking to get some help with something, then help them comment on things, share things for them, if you can be helping them and using those networks, naturally, that it will come back to you.


Anthony Story 14:21

So spending some time on understanding what your clients are doing, even if you're not actually involved in that part of the work? That will go down well, that'll buy you some definite brownie points...?


Katie Street 14:30

Without a doubt, it's about being giving and being helpful. You know, we're humans, it is a known fact, going back to the question, that people want to engage and buy from people that they like. So you know, thinking about the psychology of why you're doing things and being helpful is a great way to approach your marketing. Not to use the power of guilt, but if someone you know needs your help, and you help them, they're going to feel that they owe you something. So if you help someone, and then you say to them, “oh, you know, we're hosting an event or we're doing a talk on this or you, I'd love to, you know, come and talk to you about my business,” they're going to be much more receptive to that than just a cold, you've never met them before, in you go, trying to ask them to sell your business to them. So if you help them first, you can use the kind of psychology of guilt slightly to then help open that door up for you, you're much more likely to be able to step in there.


Anthony Story 15:33

So that's a bit of an underused weapon, "the power of the guilt trip" as a key marketing tool?


Katie Street 15:38

Yes, definitely! Do you know what there's something that happened to me the other day, so another thing which I will come on to in a moment is the power of events and hosting your own events to engage with people. So I often do that for my clients. So we will arrange or engage a whole event schedule for them. We will get people to come along and speak at those events for them. And I had a speaker, I won't name him shame him. Very high profile person within marketing ghosting me. So it actually turns out in the end that he was changing jobs and he didn't feel in the right place that he was able to talk. But I was sort of chasing him up as we had him booked in to do a talk. It was all ready to go, he'd been briefed, but he just wasn't responding to my emails. So using my powers of persuasion, a very simple message, I just reached out to him saying, "Have I lost you?" Question mark. And just by using the word lost naturally, he feels like he's losing something. And he instantly replied. So just thinking about the psychology of the language that you use is super important. And you know following the language that your prospects or the people that you want to engage with use, being very aware of the kind of language that they use, you can use tools like Grammarly. There's a fantastic platform called "Crystal Knows" which anyone who’s in business I would recommend downloads, which is a plugin that you can put on your LinkedIn profile. And when you're looking at people it tells you about their personality, how they'd like to be spoken to, how you might, you know, be able to reach out to them to get better engagement and it will even help you craft outreach emails.


Anthony Story 15:42

So you get like a personal breakdown of the psychological profile of the people you want to talk to?


Katie Street 17:28

Yes, it’s very, very clever. It will tell you everything from obviously their personality profile, but also how they like to be spoken to either to be direct or they like to be spoken to in a quite a jovial way that you know, they like to be a bit of a joker so you can totally tailor your outreach message to them.


Anthony Story 17:46

Do you know how this works?


Katie Street 17:47

It uses AI basically and picks up I think majority of the stuff that they pick up is from your LinkedIn profile, but actually, I think it plugs into Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, all of your social channels, and it aggregates the data, and then it tells you. It's incredibly accurate. I've done it on myself. I've done it on my partner. I've done it on various other people and honestly, it is 99.9% accurate. It's a brilliant tool.


Anthony Story 18:13

Have you used it today?


Katie Street 18:14

No, I haven't! I should have done - I'll do it afterwards. I have to share it to anyone who's listening. I'll share it out on my LinkedIn.


Anthony Story 18:21

Yeah although to be honest, if you're talking on a podcast, then that's trying to speak to everybody and trying to gauge that right so you just got to be yourself! I suppose that's the other important thing as well how far out of your comfort zone should you push yourself?


Katie Street 18:36

This is tough. So to me, it comes quite naturally to judge people's personalities. And I do think that's a big part of my success within the sales and marketing world is I usually have had a hypothesis for the marketing tactics that will work on the audience that I'm trying to market to because I guess I'm someone that that plugs into people's emotions and the reasons that they want something quite easily. So I'm always thinking about what are the benefits? How does this help someone? What is it that I need to do to kind of get them on my side? And I think that's often what people forget to do in their marketing, people shout about what their services are and their how, but they don't think about the benefits that they provide. And actually if you think about it, you know, why do you buy things the best your marketing tactics, value propositions, really sell through the benefits that you need, so you know, if you're looking to buy a product or a service, you need to be sold the need and the benefit, not the why and the how it's the benefit that has to come first. A lot of people talk about the "Simon Sinek Why" and things like that, and I think "why" is really important, but actually, I think it goes deeper than that and it's not just the why. It's the how and the benefit that comes out of that that's really important to me.


Anthony Story 20:03

So that really ties in to the reasons of why you set up for yourself as well, is to try and push that forward. So maybe that's a good moment to ask when you're talking to somebody, in terms of, I suppose the people who you're helping with now, so you've gone from having been the person who's responsible for selling somebody to now helping other people sell themselves.


Katie Street 20:06

Yes.


Anthony Story 20:10

So when you start talking to people about that, are there some common areas where you see, I suppose fundamental questions that people haven't addressed themselves? I suppose people are going along, they are thinking about how they try and sell the company, quite often that's tied in with, particularly for smaller companies, in terms of who they are, what they're trying to achieve. And somewhere along the line, they get to the point of going, "Yeah, this isn't quite working. I need to talk, Katie. That's what I need to do!" So is there something that you see that prompts that moment? Things that they've tried, which aren't quite working out for them?


Katie Street 21:03

I think that there's lots of things, the most common thing that comes to me is "we need more leads, we need more opportunities." And there's only a very small percentage of those people that really think about the bigger picture. So most people will initially engage us saying, "all we need you to do is to help us reach out to new connections and help us build a larger or a bigger audience. Once we get those through the door, we will be able to convert them. We're really really good at the pitch conversion piece or converting customers once we have the leads in the first place." And it's the same you know when I've worked client side and the clients go, "oh we just need you to work on a PPC campaign or a digital marketing campaign or a social campaign, whatever it might be. Because once we've got them, we know how to deal with them." And often that's through a website obviously in the B2B side of the world that I'm in, that's often more some kind of conversation or pitch or face to face scenario. Actually, the biggest problem that I see coming again and again and again, is really about exactly what we were just talking about, the initial value proposition of what it is that you're trying to sell, be it a service, or a product, I don't think that this should differentiate between the two at all, that if you can really articulate your strength and how you help companies, or how you help a person when they're buying your product, then you can define and develop much more effective marketing strategies that will attract the kind of customers that are much easier to convert because they need you in the first place. So if you're just doing random marketing outreach, or if I engage with a customer and they say, "we've sorted our value proposition, we don't want you to look at it or help us validate it or recreate it. We know what it is", and they haven't really defined who their customer is, what their customer needs, and defined a value proposition that matches to that. All of the targeting that we do, even though we may get them meetings, we may help them engage some new people, those people will be much harder to convert. So the biggest thing that I see, and every single client I engage with I now I've kind of refused to do that second piece without having done the first piece, because sometimes the agency has got a great value proposition, or sometimes the client that I'm working with has got a great value proposition. But they haven't maybe told the story in the right way, or they haven't really defined their audience fully so sometimes it's just a short validation piece. But spending time upfront, thinking about the why, the what, the who, and defining your audience just means that you're able to develop better marketing strategies, better marketing campaigns, and then have better conversion rates because the people that you're attracting into your funnel are the right people. And it is simple and we all forget to do it because we will think "oh, we just need more leads" but if you can do it properly, then it works much better.


Anthony Story 23:56

So can I just clarify that, so people feel that their challenge is they're not getting enough leads, and so that's what they're trying to do, and they're feeling that that's where the failure point is. But what you're coming in and looking at the business and discovering is, actually it's not about getting the leads, it's about what they say to the leads, once they get them?


Katie Street 24:17

Yes.


Anthony Story 24:17

So you don't necessarily need a huge amount of leads, you just need to be able to say the right story to the people who you have got? Because you could do 3 leads and if you sell the right story, then you've got 3 clients and then that means you don't have to go through a failure rate of 10 to get 30 leads to get the 3 clients.


Katie Street 24:34

Yes it’s less effort


Anthony Story 24:34

Okay, so that really argues back into that whole clarity about what it is that you stand for. I mean, most people feel that they understand that product, certainly, they understand why they're doing that, maybe they don't understand about how that connects with the people they're trying to sell to? So it's about understanding what they really want and then how their product fits in with that?


Katie Street 24:57

Exactly that and it's the psychology of sales I guess to a certain extent, call it marketing, call it sales, the truth is that they are one in the same thing. You know, you're attracting people through marketing in order to sell to them usually. So I think the key for me is really having a very strong understanding of who you're for, and the benefits that you provide, and then building your marketing around that because like you say, you can attract lots and lots of leads, but if the leads aren't right, you need to either qualify out or you're going to spend a lot of money on attracting those leads that aren't right for you. And it's going to be usually a fair amount of effort to then convert those leads. So rather than attracting and converting the wrong type of leads by doing a little piece of you know, I'm not a planner, I work with planners, I have someone who leads strategy and I work very closely with but I think the key is, a short piece of upfront research can really really help you define and hone your proposition and your messaging to the market and you know the increased margins that we're able to produce from our clients from just a short piece of work is quite phenomenal.


Anthony Story 26:10

So when you come up and you meet a client for the first time, how do you try to ascertain what that value proposition is? What message they ought to be telling to people? Do you have a process that you go through to try and break that down?


Katie Street 26:23

Yes. So we do, we have initially, and it's quite a basic thing is an onboarding process. So we'll work with clients and get them to tell us you know their side of the story. So that's, you know, talking through case studies, talking through why clients buy them, talking through proposals and different ways that they've reached out to clients to engage and get them in. Often, you know, I guess from a B2B point of view, they'll have quite a good amount of knowledge because if they have had to go and submit a proposal through an RFP process, or if they have been having lots of face to face conversations, with their clients, they should have a fairly good understanding of the problem the client had, and then what they did to solve it, or you'd like to hope so anyway. So we can take a lot from that what I think often happens is when you're in the throws of it and I have been in the throws of it myself, having been a New Business Director and a Marketing Director, kind of leading this, within agencies and with clients is, you sometimes forget how it is that you help those clients. So having someone like us that can come in, and you can sort of tell your story too, to a certain extent, gives us a little bit of a different point of view on it. We then also because we work with lots of other industry bodies, so for instance, the AAR or The Drum, we have relationships with the e-consultancy, I sit on the Southern Council for BIMA, there's lots of insights that I'm able to gleam on various topics.


Anthony Story 27:54

So those are all sort of central network organisations of some sort?


Katie Street 27:58

I guess so yeah, and they all have slightly different focuses, the IPA, for instance, is more about advertising...


Anthony Story 28:04

That's the Institute of Practitioners of Advertising?


Katie Street 28:07

Yeah. I think so - IP advertising.


Anthony Story 28:11

Not to be confused with beer.


Katie Street 28:13

No, not IPA beer, although it'd be much more fun if it was! So what I'm able to do is through those relationships is gain lots of insights and research. And then of course, we do conduct, when it's very specialist dependent on what our client is doing, whether it's marketing or digital, or creative or innovation, there's lots of crossover nowadays, that we're able to then kind of really dig deeply into what's happening within that sector. Are there any trends? What frustrations the client currently has? Where do they need help? You know there are some really big trends, certainly within the marketing agency, or digital marketing, creative agency sector, where people need to move quickly. There's lots of startups certainly, for instance, in the FinServ and in the FinTech sector, there's lots of startups and various other people coming into the market moving much more quickly than maybe the big banks can. So therefore, the big banks need to move and act a lot more quickly than they probably have done in the past. So them employing another big agency that have got the same layers of complexity that they have, isn't necessarily a good choice for them anymore. So they want these smaller, faster innovation companies that are able to help them change and evolve much more quickly so that they can either catch up with the startups or, you know, try and stay one step ahead. So I think the world is changing, and it's changing quickly. I'm very lucky that I get to work with lots of agencies and lots of, you know, I guess, governing bodies, etc. so I have some, you know, some very good insights into what's happening within the marketplace and how clients need help. You know, and I guess that's, you know, part and parcel of my job to highlight that.


Anthony Story 29:50

So that's something else as well then, the difference between the more established businesses and the new businesses is that there is a different approach and that needs to be reflected in how you tell that story as well, presumably. So understanding where you fit into whichever your marketplace might be, but having a good understanding, a clear understanding. I suppose there's always a danger that you might end up doing a bit of too much self reflecting and navel gazing? And going, oh, yes this is who we are...


Katie Street 30:16

Yes don't over research it! Yeah, and don't use buzzwords, you know try to be true. The biggest advice that I can give, certainly to B2B agencies and tech and software providers is if you can tell people how you help them. The what you do may change over time. "We enable companies to break through faster", for instance, could be a strapline, for an innovation company. If you're able to stay true to that. Then how you do that may change. But keeping an eye and making sure that you're not too worried about if things change internally, you know, we live in a world that changes all the time. Don't over navel gaze, but also don't forget to do it, I guess, do kind of relook at yourself once every year and say, "okay, how have we changed in the last year? Is there anything different from where we were last year? Are we helping companies do different things to what they were doing or what we were doing with them last year?" Don't be afraid to look at that.


Anthony Story 31:19

So as part of that research piece, how much time should you spend on looking about what your clients want and who they are? And the reasons of why they're buying from you in the first place? And is that something that you can factor in in terms of how you tell your story?


Katie Street 31:32

Yeah, so the other thing that we will always advocate doing is for my clients to speak to their clients or usually for us to do that on their behalf to get some clarity and I guess some realism on how they really do help them. So they may think that their clients buy them because they're incredibly creative, but actually when you speak to the client, if you speak to a section of maybe six to eight clients, it might be that what sings through much more obviously, is that they're really safe pair of hands and they enable them to move their projects on much more quickly than they would be able to do without them. So I think, listen to your clients and how you help them. And that's a really basic and obvious thing that I know, I did do once when I was sat in my position as a new business director, but I think you forget to do you get so busy, you probably naturally know some of the reasons that you help but when you start to actually dig into the research and you can start to correlate those things with what's happening in the industry, what your clients really value you for, the value that you believe you provide. If you can map that together and define a really strong value proposition, then that's going to just enable you to fly. And the other key thing, slightly off subject but it isn't really, is people spend an awful lot of time in my experience really looking at themselves and trying to define a value proposition that's strong, and then they put it on their website, they shove it in their pitch deck, and that's done. We've done our value proposition. It's on the website brilliant. What they forget to do is build their marketing strategy and tactics around it. So don't then forget that if you're an agency that helps people deliver things faster, then you should develop some kind of marketing tactics that represent fastness. So that might be, I don't know, it could be running a Pecha Kucha style event where you've got lots of different people talking for 30 seconds or 60 seconds, I can't remember what it is, is it 45 seconds?


Anthony Story 33:40

I think it's four minutes with 20 slides.


Katie Street 33:42

Oh there we go. So there we go. I can't remember what it was. But something that represents...


Anthony Story 33:46

Maybe six minutes, something like that...


Katie Street 33:48

But something that represents exactly that, so do something, if you're all about being fast and helping your clients innovate more quickly, then do something that's fast and helps them innovate more quickly. Sing that through your marketing, don't just spend all this time defining a value proposition, shove it on your website and hope to God that people are going to find it because they may do. But if you can build your marketing around it, you're going to attract the right people, it's about attracting the right people into that funnel. So it's a much more effective way of doing things.


Anthony Story 34:19

That reminds me of the Virgin Media, superfast broadband, where they had Usain Bolt,


Katie Street 34:23

Exactly, there we go!


Anthony Story 34:24

Most of us can't afford Usain Bolt and huge amounts of TV spots to get some advertising in. So are there other kind of much simpler ways of doing that? I was interested in terms of coming back maybe to the basics a little bit in terms of you were talking about getting your clients to come to events and to maybe recommend you to other people. So how valuable is that? In terms of, you know, do you get involved in away days and do you ask clients and then get them to bring somebody else with them from a different prospect agency?


Katie Street 35:05

Yes. So all of the above, I guess. One of the key things that I tend to advocate is developing some form of event series. So that might be a breakfast event series that might be a lunch, it might be a dinner, it might be something totally different, might be a series of workshops that you can invite people into, it might be a series of training that you can invite people to, but having that ability to have the face to face connections with potential clients is absolutely huge. Because 1) you form much stronger relationships, 2) you're able to gather a whole load of customer insight, regardless of you know, what sector or what industry you're in, and it's really interesting. So it's something that the B2B world has probably been doing for quite a long time, and probably on a kind of larger scale have been doing kind of larger theatre style events, where they're getting some fantastic speakers in, speaking to the room. A big change that I've started to implement, and certainly working with my clients on, is much smaller, more intimate events. So sometimes that's training, but more often than not, it's breakfasts or lunches, where you're actually getting maybe up to 20 really, really senior thought leaders into a room from prospect companies that you want to be engaging with, to talk about the challenges that they're facing around a certain subject, maybe that is linked back to your proposition, and how you help them. So what is it? So for instance, let's keep going with the fast thing because it's great. And also I'm quite a fast person naturally. So if it was about faster, what methods are you using to help break through and enable your company to innovate faster? So invite Heads of Innovation, Heads of Marketing, whatever it might be, to come and discuss that in a closed room. Not only does that give you face to face conversations round a table with 20 of your best prospects, but also your live hearing exactly what their problems are and their frustrations, what's working, what isn't working, so that you can then fuel the rest of your marketing around that. And you've got some really tangible things to go back to them with.


Anthony Story 37:14

Do you feel that people are really willing to turn up to those or do people look at it and go "hmmm that looks a little bit like some sort of secret selling thing going on...!"


Katie Street 37:23

Well, yeah, we do really well at them. For instance, we've got two events, actually, that we're hosting for clients next week. So I've got quite a busy week, both breakfasts, I'm going to be very up very early, but having lovely breakfast, which is great. But yeah, we've got people like the CEO of giffgaff, the CEO of the British Red Cross turning up because they're on this kind of disruption journey, and they want to learn from others how they can disrupt and change and do things differently. So 100% if you get your subject right, and you've done your research, so everything that we've been talking about, and you've got it a subject that people want to learn about and that they need some help with, then you absolutely should get cut through. But that's why that research piece is really important. Don't just think that you know what your customers want and need, you do need to spend a little bit of time researching it, and then developing really compelling messages.


Anthony Story 38:15

So in terms of getting the likes of giffgaff, to come along, is that because you're working for a big company with a brand...?


Katie Street 38:22

No it's a startup, that no one's heard of!


Anthony Story 38:24

Okay, so how have you got them in the room? Is that the secret sauce that Street Agency brings in? Or can anybody do that?


Katie Street 38:33

I think that there's things that we do within our process that enable you to get that cut through so anyone could do it, as long as they know how to do it, I guess. Yeah, I don't have any relationship with the CEO of giffgaff, or the CEO of the British Red Cross. The subject that we've pushed out to them, we've done some research on, we've developed a really strong message, we picked a nice venue that has a bit of a story behind it, we've got some fantastic speakers there. So they're attracted in because it's something that they need to do or they need to change or they need help with and they're interested in the subject. So developing a subject that is going to resonate with your audience is hugely important. Some of it's luck, some of it's judgement, but, you know, touch wood, because of the process that we go through and the research that we do, it works and you'll see even now, you know, some of the larger FinTech, you can't really call them startups anymore, but for instance, I think "curve" do this and so do "tide", they now do community events. So if you're a curve or a tide banker, then you can go on to their website or they'll send you an email and outreach and they'll have community events that will help you do better banking or whatever it is that you need to learn about such as how to run your bank account more healthily or for tide, obviously is business banking so they're probably a little bit more niche and they've got some subjects that they can talk about or help with your business or FD speakers that might be able to help you make more money.


Anthony Story 40:06

What sort of speakers do you get? And are they people who turn up because they also are interested in the conversation? Or do you have to pay people? What sort of budgets do you need to think about for this kind of thing?


Katie Street 40:15

I've never paid a speaker to date. So you know, it's a piece of work to invest some time into engaging and getting good speakers and making sure that they are a good speaker as well.


Anthony Story 40:28

Are the speakers from industry or are they academic? Or does it just depend on what the topic is and who the best people are?


Katie Street 40:33

Totally dependent. So a mixture of everything, often it's industry experts that are relevant to whatever it is that we're talking about. So it could be someone that's totally left field dependent on the proposition and the kind of story that you're trying to tell, but you want to make sure it's something that your audience are interested in. So a high profile speaker, a high profile venue, and a fantastic subject is always going to be a great way to go. They don't have to cost a lot of money. Not a lot of the breakfasts that we do, will cost, apart from our costs obviously as an agency, but we'll cost anything between £500 and £1000 and that's including feeding up to about 20 people, so they don't have to be expensive, but you do need to invest time in doing them.


Anthony Story 41:24

And in terms of getting those speakers, it feels a bit "chicken and egg" in terms of getting the speakers to commit to coming because you've got to do that before you go and get these big CEOs to come along to this and is it just a leap of faith that if you just invest enough time and energy into it, it's definitely going to work?


Katie Street 41:44

I guess so. It's the research, and I keep mapping back to research, but you have to have made sure that the subject is something that's going to resonate and often I advocate agencies, or my clients to trust in what the speaker is saying. So we'll do some speaker outreach, and almost guide your subject around what your speaker wants to say, rather than trying to force an agenda upon them. If you can understand from them, the challenges that they've had, it's highly likely the people that are in similar roles to them that you're probably looking to prospect and target too are going to have similar challenges. So let your speaker guide you on the subject matter and what they want to talk about, because it's highly likely that they've got lots of other people within their industry sector that have got similar problems.


Anthony Story 41:46

That's really interesting. It's relatively simple. It's relatively straight forward.


Katie Street 42:36

It's obvious when you think about it.


Anthony Story 42:37

Yeah but I think it comes back to that point you made right at the beginning, that there is a sense of fear of going "oh my god, what happens if I screw up" which is what this series of podcasts is all about, it's really about me going well, how do I make sure I don't screw up more? I keep saying it’s about how to be better, but that's really what it's about. You just need to be committed and just feel like okay, and I suppose the one thing in is that if you link it into an area that you have a degree of confidence in, which links into some sense of what your business does, the fact you've set it up means you must have some confidence in your ability to be able to deliver that. So therefore you're well placed to do this, you just need to have enough knowledge to be able to convince people to come along, but you can actually leave the really hard work to the speakers.


Katie Street 43:22

Yeah, exactly. And you become the connector, and what that enables you to do often, certainly, for these kind of smaller, more engaged events that we put on, is you're having conversations with 20 people. I mean, how hard is that usually, to do to have really decent conversations with 20 of your prospects, learn from them, and build a relationship with 20 people, you know, within the space of a couple of hours? It's not that easy to do. And, of course, there's a whole load of nurturing and you're not necessarily going to convert those all into opportunities on the next day, but over, you know, 2-3-6 month period nurturing those and there will also be a whole load of people that wanted to attend that event that couldn't come. So if you had a 20 person breakfast, you might end up having on average, I would say, we would end up having anything between 50 and 80 people that engaged with us during that process, and you've got between 50 and 80 really engaged prospects. If you start doing that monthly or quarterly, you can start to see how that builds up and would affect your pipeline quite quickly.


Anthony Story 44:25

So earlier, you were talking about the process that you employ as an agency coming into new companies to really try and dissect who they are, what they do, how to engage customers, the whole value proposition piece, and I think you're talking about four steps. So we've definitely covered 1 and 2. Have we all had 3 or 4? How are we doing on that?


Katie Street 44:44

So I guess we've kind of probably dipped into little bits of it. But the 4 stage process, as I see it is, 1) onboarding and really understanding, you know, the landscape, your agency or your company, your customers, so it's that kind of market research piece. The second phase is then I guess identifying, well, you will have already done this but identifying your audience and developing a really strong value proposition that's going to get you the cut through and that your audience is going to care about. Step 3 is then developing your sales and marketing strategy and plan. So if this who we are for and what we're about, how can we sing that through our sales and marketing, and develop campaigns that help us tell that message. You know, more often than not, I see companies that spend so much time really digging into this, but then they forget to sing it through their marketing and therefore, they don't get the value out of all of that lovely work that they've done. So singing it through your marketing and developing strong strategies that really help you push that out to the market. And also, of course, often in that phase 3, there's a kind of bit of what I kind of call housework to be done. So updating your website with content, rewriting your case studies and things so that they're, you know, in line with exactly what you're trying to push out and not just, you know, I guess the kind of normal three stage case study that I get very bored of seeing is you know "what was the brief, what was our approach, what were the results" which is really important, but totally flip that on its head, talk about the impact. Based on your value proposition, if you help people break through problems more quickly, then that's your top stat "we help them break through and win more new business than ever before by x" and totally flip that so sell the impact first, and then make sure that you're singing that through your case studies, make sure that you're singing that through your creds, your email outreach, your campaigns, your social media, everywhere that you're pushing things out, make sure that that's front, first and foremost, and as well as your kind of push marketing, make sure that you're being insights-led as well and that your pull marketing is going to attract the right kind of people. And then of course, stage 4 is doing it. So you're running those campaigns, running those events, developing the outreach. So it's a fairly simple process: research, set your value proposition, define a marketing strategy, create your assets. Number 4, off you go. Start doing it.


Anthony Story 47:27

Okay, that's great. That's definitely some steps to follow. And it's been good to dive in to some of the ways in which you can actually deliver that. I think that's some really tangible outcomes. I just wanted to ask you, coming back to that point about how you've gone from, I don't know what are you gamekeeper turned poacher now?


Katie Street 47:45

I don't know really somewhere in the middle!


Anthony Story 47:47

Have you always wanted to set up your own company?


Katie Street 47:49

Yes, I think I have, but it was about being brave enough to do it and I've been a single mum since my daughter was a year old. So guess some of it was financial you know could I afford to do it and I have been able to afford to do it you know, things are going really really well. Within a year I've got three staff now which does feel a bit scary sometimes. But I wouldn't have been able to take on a lot of the business that we are taking on without them so I couldn't scale without them. But yeah, I think I always had wanted to. You'll probably be able to give me some tips on what other people say here but about being brave enough to just make that jump and for me I think I was brave enough it was just about the finances you know I need to make sure that I could afford to pay for everything for a few months if things didn't go as I'd hoped they would. But luckily they have and even better.


Anthony Story 48:46

Yeah, well cash flow is a thing we probably should do an episode about!


Katie Street 48:51

Definitely. Definitely. It's the biggest worry that you have as a business owner, I think is mapping forwards. How long can I keep going for if things were to quieten up tomorrow, and of course, because I am in new business at the moment, I don't seem to have any problem with attracting and winning new clients, that's something that does come quite naturally to me. And you know, I'm not even necessarily practising everything I preach at the moment because I've just got people coming to me through my own network. So that number one thing that we spoke about referrals is still working really hard for me. But I'm also ever so aware that come another six months, or a year's time, as exactly the brief that I get from my clients is, "oh, you know, I built my whole business on referrals, and now they're tending to dry up and now I need to be a bit more new business focused." So I know, I have to stay one step ahead of myself on that. So hence, I've just employed someone to come in and do my marketing for me.


Anthony Story 49:47

So I mean, we don't know each other well, but you strike me as somebody with good purpose, good drive, and you're training to run a marathon.


Katie Street 49:54

I know. Oh, my goodness. I do kind of regret signing up for that slightly but I'm still doing it! No, do you know what, I've actually really enjoyed my marathon training so far, although I'm full of cold and I should have run this morning and I haven't done. I think yeah, I like it. I'm someone that likes a challenge and I'm someone that likes change. And the marathon has enabled me to 1) get my teeth stuck into a challenge and 2) change all of my habits. So I'm not necessarily a creature of habit, but I'm very much enjoying my new fitness regime. See, I'm running two or three times a week one very long run. But I'm also doing HIIT sort of blaze classes, I think they're called and doing yoga and I'm doing a lot more than I would usually do and I'm really enjoying that.


Anthony Story 50:41

Have you always been like this, what was school like for you? Were you good at school?


Katie Street 50:45

Oh, gosh, I was good at sports at school. That was something that yeah, I think I came second or something in the pentathlon. I'm very proud of that. So I've always been naturally very good at sport, but maybe haven't always applied myself as well as I could have in that probably goes to the same in all my lessons, I was always in other top groups for everything but didn't necessarily apply myself as well as I could.


Anthony Story 51:09

So do you feel like you're doing that now? I'm interested I suppose can an entrepreneur be made? Or is it just naturally inherent, it's always there, it's just a question of when you decide "okay, it's finally time I've got to get on with it, I can't put it off any longer." Do you have to have that drive inside you to begin with?


Katie Street 51:26

Some people start very young, and to be fair, this is the third company that I've set up so let's hope third time lucky and I've learned a lot from both the previous companies I set up with someone else not to say that that's a bad thing, but it just didn't work those times around for me. So I feel me being in a little bit more control and setting up my own thing and doing it alone this time already I'm having a lot more success than I have done when I've been in a partnership beforehand. But yeah, I think I was always going to, you know, go out on my own. It was something that's been within me for a long time. It's just been about you, like I said, finances and being brave enough to kind of take that step and go out on my own. So yeah, I'm excited about what the future is going to hold for for me and for Street.


Anthony Story 52:17

And what's been the biggest challenges you've had so far?


Katie Street 52:21

Biggest challenge, so personally, getting organised. So that's why I'm now focusing on employing people that are and this is a good strategy to have, I think, employing people that are quite different to me. So naturally, my first employee, although a lot younger than me, about 15 years younger than me, sad and when that starts to happen, is very, very similar to me. She is if I map myself back to when I was in my early 20s, she is almost identical to me and she's brilliant. She's fantastic. She runs our campaigns for us, she's brilliant at engaging clients and building rapport and building relationships. So she was great, but if it was just me and her, the business would be all over the place. So what I've learned is that I need to employ people that I guess challenge me and are quite different to me that gives the business a bit more balance and organisation. So I now have two people that work for me who are much more organised, a bit more methodical. You know, I'm all about the big ideas and charging forward and getting things done. Whereas they're able to go okay, we'll take a step back, how about we think about doing this and putting plans in place and getting very organised. So there's four of us, two of us being probably quite out there and excitable characters and two being still very exciting and brilliant but...


Anthony Story 53:39

...bringing some structure in as well?


Katie Street 53:41

100%


Anthony Story 53:41

So when you set up your other businesses as a matter of interest, were they with people who are similar to you?


Anthony Story 53:46

Yes both exactly the same.


Anthony Story 53:47

Often you hear most people say it's better to set up a business with somebody else because it just means that you can halve some of the anxieties you have but set up with somebody who complements yourself rather than somebody who matches yourself. Does that ring true? It sounds like that's what you're doing but without actually having them as a partner per se, but you'll bring that into the business, so you've got that structure, which allows you to be the kind of "whey we're doing the kind of brilliant Katie Street thing!"


Katie Street 54:18

Yeah, be mad in the corner somewhere and keep talking and annoying everyone! Yeah, I think so. I think having that balance has been really important. And although they're not partners of the business, some things that I've started from day one of setting my business up and some of my clients won't like to hear this, but I think it's important for the success of my businesses, is being flexible, so everyone works a 32 hour week, so some people are choosing to do, you know, three days and then two half day, some people are doing four eight hour days and then having a day off, but having flexibility, everyone feeling like they've got ownership of things, and that they're able to make a difference. So actually what I'm going to speak to my accountants about actually next week is setting up the EIMS share scheme. So, although I haven't gone into business with someone, all the three people that I work with, in fact, two employees one's on a contract. I feel like they're in this business with me, I don't feel like I'm on my own. So I'm a naturally very open person, I tell anyone anything about myself. And I share the business with them. It's not my business and their business I've set up what I would like to think is very flexible, working environment, somewhere where they're able to flourish, I'm giving them total ownership of things, so that they're able to have ideas, they're able to run things as they see fit as well, because I guess one of the things that I've had where I've been employed is this kind of dictatorship or you have a boss, I totally do not believe in having a boss or a dictatorship. It should be you have a leader and everyone is able to input and I think or I hope, that that's going to mean that I have a much better, you know, future for the company because everyone feels part of it and everyone's got input and they're able to shape it to be something that they're proud of as well.


Anthony Story 56:10

There were some really interesting points that Andrew Walker made in our first podcast that we launched. In terms of some of the experience that he had, and also he works with a lot of startup companies and what they do with shares and about not liberally sprinkling them, but being very tactical in terms of how you use them. So have a listen! And also, Sean Guppy in our legal one talks about some of the implications of shares so I think that's, again, really important to get that right. But I think that idea of trying to give people a sense of ownership in what they're doing. You come across as being boundlessly, open and enthusiastic and that probably rings true throughout the company. So I think people must feel like they have the freedom to feel like they can be part of that. So investing in that time and bringing people to have a sense of ownership about that makes a lot of sense. Yes. Particularly kind of for the longevity because if you have the right people and you want them to be part of it just makes life so much easier doesn't it?


Katie Street 57:17

Yeah, definitely and trying to be fair, you know, I don't know if I'm the best boss in the world. Although I love people and love being around people. I don't like managing people, I don't really like telling people off. So making sure that you're that they're basically in this with me, and that, you know, they'd hopefully tell themselves off because they have ownership of it is a much better place for me because I'm not someone that's going to tell people off for turning up to work 10 minutes late, and I don't think that builds a good culture. I like things to be flexible. If you're 10 minutes late, stay for 10 minutes at the end of the day, or to be honest, if you're getting your work done, and you do half the amount of time that you're employed to do it in, if you're smashing it, I don't actually care. This year, it's about being effective and empowering people to manage themselves. And that's not right for everyone. But you know, then you don't employ them. And hopefully, I'm giving people the freedom that if it's not going to work, I'm going to know within their first three months, and then they won't stay, they won't be part of the culture. And it isn't for everyone. But I think I've tried to be quite clever and careful about who I've employed. In fact, most people that I've employed, I've worked with, or they've worked for me previously. So you know, they are people that I know and trust as well, which has helped.


Anthony Story 58:36

Fantastic Katie, it has been fantastic to talk to you. Thank you so much.


Katie Street 58:39

Thank you.


Anthony Story 58:40

And so where can people find you?


Katie Street 58:42

Yes. So our website is street.agency. And in fact, we're street.agency in most places also on Instagram and on LinkedIn. So yeah, please do feel free to reach out and connect with us and if we can help you get in touch.


Anthony Story 58:55

Fantastic. Thank you very much.


Katie Street 58:56

Thank you.


Anthony Story 58:58

I hope you enjoyed the episode. There's more information about all of our guests and all the topics they talk about at 10thdegree.co.uk. And also, please do review us. We really want to share the lessons and the advice that's given as widely as possible and this really helps us to get that message out there. Thanks